Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 1 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 2 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 3 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 4 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 5 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 6 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 7 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 8 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 9 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 10 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 11 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 12 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 13 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 14 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 15 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 16 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 17 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 18 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 19 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 20 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 21 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 22 of 23 Sustainable Robotic iLand - Image 23 of 23

Sustainable Robotic iLand

2021-12-15 20:08 - 0 Comments

Currently most sustainabile responses are focused on land where we can monitor the proposed changes, while the water which covers 70% of our Earth’s surface tends to be neglected. Since the phytoplankton growing within the oceans provides 50% of Earth’s photosynthesis, ocean vitality is paramount for all life. Already we have lost 30% and 14% of phytoplankton in the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans respectively since the 80s. Specifically, we must counteract the damaging effects of excess carbon dioxide and acidification from our polluting habits. Globally, very few opportunities exist for communities to monitor natural underwater conditions and in Vancouver this is further restricted by our disconnection from the water along the sea wall. Alder bay offers us an environmentally monitorable, highly visible, heavily trafficked and isolated calm surface as a testing ground for informative interventions. Public Feedback Forms and Vancouver’s Speak Up! surveys have identified a strong majority of residents in Metro Vancouver are in support of Granville Island becoming a leader in sustainability even if payback on investment is longer. Popular suggestions from the survey include awareness campaigns, reducing transportation energy, reducing water contaminants and aquatic environment enhancement.

This projects aims to address these concerns through playful group interaction. As well, this project aims to address two other needs identified in the survey: improving access to Granville Island and relieving congestion by offering more than the present 6% area for flexible public / performance space. Exploration of the quieter south-eastern quadrant of Granville Island is also reinforced by novel opportunities to interact with the water. In summary, opportunities to develop leadership in sustainability are incorporated in functional uses of this area and costs of the robotic implementation are thus more easily justified.

The seamless and simultaneous transformation of the area from play to water managment, performance space, gathering space and transportation route is intended to mix users. This design will also expose the Granville Island community to the significance of group dependent sustainable reactions that can arise from spontaneous play where the focus is on the process of play action rather than the results or consequences. People will participate in a group effort and at the same time they will be able to clearly identify their individual efforts as part of a whole. Reactions to other people’s interest and interaction are expected to make a meaningful impression and contribute to enduring sustainable reactions.

“When individuals become players, leisure contributes to their quality of life and that of their community and requires a collective implementation of the values relating to quality of life; leisure is a powerful tool in the social capital development of communities and; leisure is a place for learning, the expression of public participation, and the heart of democratic life. Therefore, since leisure affects quality of life, contributes to social capital development and represents a place for expression and learning of democratic life, leisure plays an essential role in the social, cultural, political and economical development of communities.” - Delegates from the 10th World Leisure Congress, October 6-10, 2008 in Quebec City, Canada.

Ultimately Motivation is the most sustainable tool we can develop. Positively reinforcing long-term actions within a playful, collaborative setting can yield the most sustainable changes.

Submitted by Patrick Danielson

2.493975

Comments

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.

Your e-mail-address will be stored electronically, but will not be published. Comments of offensive nature or commercial content will be removed.

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters (without spaces) shown in the image. This validation is required to prevent spam and other unwanted posts.